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Clients

Film Brings the Dramatic Tension of LUCE to Life at Sundance

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“LUCE stars Kelvin Harrison Jr., Naomi Watts, Tim Roth and Octavia Spencer as well the cinematography talents of Larkin Seiple (Cop Car). “I was attracted to its focus on character development, dialogue and the subtle tension it built,” notes Seiple. “This was the first feature I was able to shoot on 35mm, which changed how I approached the project.”

A film print was made from the Digital Intermediate (DI) that was projected for the world premiere at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. “Simply put, film is the best-looking format,” remarks Seiple. “The color rendition is astonishing. After color grading it and seeing what it does for skin and faces, I’ll be hard pressed to opt for digital over film. “

Read the full article here.

Shia LaBeouf’s Memoir Movie HONEY BOY Is His Most Tender Project Yet

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“As an act of memoir, the film is fascinating to behold – it feels strikingly personal and intimate, as though you’re seeing the pages of a journal reimagined for the screen. But the pain is never played exploited. With Har’el at the helm [and production design by JC Molina], it feels dream-like and hazy, an aesthetic rendering of memory’s fluidity, while also examining the ways in which trauma can occupy a strange space in our minds. The adult Otis, addressing his therapist, says of his father, “The only thing of any value he gave me was pain, and you want to take it away?” Anyone who’s ever carried a similar wound with them might recognise the way in which it becomes a comfort – something you can cling to, and even weaponise yourself.”

Read the full article here.

DP Jomo Fray on SELAH AND THE SPADES and Drawing Inspiration From Rihanna’s ANTI

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[Director of Photography Jomo Fray on his long-in-the-making collaboration with Poe]:  “The director, Tayarisha Poe, and I met a few years ago about the project and pretty quickly became totally creatively enamored with one another. We both have very similar ideological approaches to cinema and enjoy taking risks and trying to find new images together. I think after that first meeting we were both buzzing with ideas and thoughts. Although there were a few years between that meeting and principal photography, Tayarisha and I would always be sending images or ideas back and forth with one another. The interesting thing came when we started prep on the film armed with literally years’ worth of images. I think we were both so plugged into the aesthetic at that point that it felt like second nature, and it was from that place that we both realized that we wanted to surprise ourselves and be surprised on set, so we opted to strip back our references to their core and try and find new ways of looking at all of these images we had collected. It was out of that process that the look and feel of the film emerged.”

Read the full interview here.